How To Create Offers That Sell Themselves

I think as internet marketers we often get too caught up in the small things when it comes to selling. Sure doing your A/B testing is important, but at the end of the day it comes down to whether or not you have a good offer.

You can have the best sales page and marketing team out there, but if your core offer sucks, your sales are going to suck too.

So lets go over what really makes an offer “pop”, and how you can craft your own irresistible offers that will practically sell themselves.

 

Commodities VS Offers

First we need to understand the difference between a commodity and an offer. An example of a commodity would be an “acne cream”, whereas an offer would be the same acne cream in addition to a 10 video skincare course, customized daily skin routine, and initial skin consultation.

As as a consumer looking for acne cream, which would you choose if the prices were the same? Obviously the latter.

Well you may say that there is a lot more in the latter example, but really what does it cost you to produce the latter?  You only have to create the video course once.  For the customized daily skin routine maybe you create 5 different generic routines based on the most common skin types.  And finally the skin consultation may take 10 minutes over Skype.

However that being said all these additions will allow you to charge much more too.  For example maybe the acne cream by itself you can only sell for $40, but you can sell the latter entire system for $129.

irresistible offer

So as you can see in this generic example we took a boring acne cream and jazzed it up into an irresistible offer that is not only unique, but will likely sell better than just the acne cream alone.

Be Objective And Self Aware With Your Offers

Something that I used to fall victim to was not being objective with what I was selling.  Any time you create your own product, you as a product creator think that what you’re selling is the best thing since sliced bread.  So what happens is you either price it too high or are shocked when it doesn’t sell.

For example say you’re a personal trainer and you decide you’re going to sell customized diet and exercise plans to your clients for $150.  Even if these plans were weight loss miracles, you’d probably still struggle to sell them.  Lets face it what you’re offering to you seems great, but to a buyer it seems kind of bland.

Now what if you took those same diet and exercise plans and then said you’re going to do weekly Skype checkups with them, and also offered to train them at the gym twice a week for a month.

For something like that you could probably charge $1000/mo (recurring) and people would pay for it since the offer is that much more intriguing than just the diet and exercise plans alone.

So again if your struggling with sales, take a step back and ask yourself “Would I buy what I’m offering?”.  If not, you have to go back to the drawing board and change things up.

Have A Clearly Defined Benefit

Finally getting back to the marketing of things, to create an “irresistible offer” we need a tangible benefit that buyers can wrap their heads around.

So for example we don’t want to use vague benefits like “Get in the best shape of your life”, we want to use “Lose 10 pounds in your first 2 weeks”.

It’s not “Become a better golfer”, we want to say “Cut 5 strokes off your game practicing just 10 minutes a day”.

vague benefits

When you have a dialed in benefit, it’s easier for people to grasp and they will be more willing to buy.  It’s also easier to create copy that sells around a specific well-defined benefit, which again will increase your sales.

I hope this article got you thinking about what sort of tweaks you can make to your own sales campaigns.  Remember you can do all the split testing in the world, but if what you’re offering sucks, you’re going to struggle.

Richard Yoshimura

Entrepreneur. SEO Consultant. Marketing Enthusiast. I'm here to help you build better websites that make you more money.

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